10/04/18: Live From Ad Week – Day 3

A CYNOPSIS MESSAGE FROM NAB SHOW NEW YORK
What is the future of content monetization? How is that different than advertising? Find out at NAB Show New York.
 
Television needs to make money. There’s subscriptions, sponsorships, branded content, native ads, interactive ads and more. Examine what smart marketers are up to in this new landscape.

Moderator: Alan Wolk, Co-Founder, Lead Analyst, TVREV; Speakers: Gavin Douglas, CEO, iPowow; Zane Vella, Vice President, Product, Comcast Cable

View the schedule, search exhibitors and get a FREE Core Package. Use code MP09.
CynopsisMEDIA PRESENTS:
Live from Advertising Week

10/04/18

By Randee Dawn

 

Advertising Week New York wrapped things up Thursday, having spent the week sharing inside insights from experts about disruptions, delivering on digital, and just how to actually prove your ROI. The venue – AMC Loews Lincoln Square – was packed with booths from LinkedIn, TouchVirtual and Deloitte Digital to name just a few, while Target took up an entire floor to itself. During the week, A-list names including David Schwimmer, Will Smith and Katie Couric packed the theaters, with attendee lines winding down staircases and through hallways for as much as an hour ahead of time. Here’s what you might have missed if you couldn’t make it out there – and a few things you might have missed even if you were there!

 

A CYNOPSIS MESSAGE FROM THE SPONSORSHIP GROUP FOR PUBLIC TELEVISION
PBS’s uncluttered, category-exclusive
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Your brand will stand out , because PBS accepts no more
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far fewer than commercial broadcast and cable networks.
 
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Set your brand apart with a PBS sponsorship from SGPTV. 
Visit SGPTV.org to learn more.
 

PANEL SNAPSHOTS
 
There’s a language disconnect when trying to determine any numbers in a campaign, because ROI doesn’t always conform to a neat set of numbers, panelists on Show Me the Money: Proving ROI Has Never Been Easier revealed. “The things that we measure in media don’t often line up with real-life outcomes,” Mike Romoff, Head of Global Agency & Channel Sales, LinkedIn noted. “So, if there is a metric our compulsion is to put it in a spreadsheet, stack rank and cut off the bottom third and say we’re serving. It’ll take a while before we can measure to that level of depth.” As his fellow panelists John Povey, SVP Marketing & Data Analytics, a4 Media; Antonio Tomarchio CEO, Cuebiq; and Karima Zmerli, PhD, Chief Data Sciences Officer, Wavemaker Global added, direct marketing is easy to understand, because the numbers are clean, but if you’re looking to measure a campaign aimed at raising brand awareness, you’ll probably be disappointed by number results. “If we are looking at pushing a brand campaign and basing it on sales, you need a long window, you need a year to see the results based on sales,” said Zmerli. “If we are trying to link long window metric going from awareness to sales in one campaign that only lasts a month, that’s not possible.”
 
Nobody had to ask where the beef was at the Wendy’s Brings the Sass to Social panel, in which the fast-food company (whose wildly successful We Beefin’? hit mixtape was a Grand winner at Wednesday’s Clio Awards) sat down to talk Twitter strategy, and the virtues of truly knowing your own brand. “You have to play the cards you’ve been dealt based on the history of the company,” said Kurt Kane, Chief Concept and Marketing Officer for Wendy’s. (Other panelists included Marcus Peterzell, EVP, Entertainment at Ketchum; Nina Mishkin, Brand and Content Strategy Lead at Twitter; and actor and social media influencer Josh Peck. “Our biggest advice is to stay true to who you are as a brand, and do the hard work to unpack that.” By turning its Twitter feed into an outlet to diss competitors like Burger King and McDonald’s, Wendy’s has reshaped what’s possible for a brand on social media, he noted, and is willing to talk with followers about anything. On top of that, “We fight McDonald’s every day there,” said Kane. “If the people [at McDonald’s headquarters] aren’t kicking a trash can over something we did, we’re not doing it right.”
 
Do brands need to stand for something in order to engender consumer loyalty? Brand Love, Brand Loyalty & The Pursuit of Purpose panelists David Gaines, Chief Strategy Officer, Wavemaker and Edwin Wong, VP of Research and Insights, Buzzfeed each had insights into the somewhat gray area between hard commerce and “love” of product. “Be polarizing,” said Gaines, after discussion of Nike‘s recent use of NFL player and activist Colin Kaepernick as the face of their campaign. “People are more inclined to side with a team that has a point of view these days. If Nike can do something as big and bold as this, hopefully other brands will decide they need to stand for something.” For Wong, it’s about “what side of history do you want to be on? Is this all about the money? … Brands that stand up for what’s right will win in the end.”
 
Not all ads are created equal, particularly when they’re meant to be shared across platforms. So how to reconcile a campaign with the very different needs of different types of eyeballs? That was the focus of the Cohesive Cross Platform panel. For Toddy Stewart, Partner/ECD, Picture Farm, the first issue was finding the right tone. “If you’re looking for something that works across platforms, the core question is, what is the voice?” he asked. And as has been noted on other platforms this week, it’s about understanding your audience first – on TV, audiences will put up with minutes’ worth of ads to watch a football game, but click away if you present them with a 30-second ad just to watch a 1-minute video. “There has to be payoff for the audience,” said Peter Kain, Executive Creative Director, BBDO New York. “You have to study how audiences interact with different platforms.” Advertisers can also be constrained by campaigns that work so well they can’t really be altered too much for new platforms. “You have to find new ways of looking at it,” said Kain, who admitted they were known for “experimenting” on “low-budget” channels with new concepts before attempting to take them wider. “Every day is an experiment,” said Claire Knebl, Head of Brand Marketing, Ritual. “It’s an educated experiment. There are no real mistakes – we just want to see where each post or story takes us.”
 
The fragmentation of media may be rocking the industry, but the panelists in Go Where Your Fans Are: Bringing TV to Real Life see it as an opportunity. “We’ve embraced the fragmentation,” said Sean Moran, Head of Marketing and Partner solutions at Viacom, noting that because of the company’s young demo, “We had to deal with it sooner than some others…. We had that audience that was saying, ‘We appreciate this, but we’re going go over here…and over here.’” As for the future, Moran, points to companies working together for initiatives like OpenAP, saying, “We can go where we need to go if we do it together.” Carla Hassan, former EVP, Global CMO of Toys “R” Us, noted – with a phrase that earned a thumbs up from the group – that the companies that are winning in the new world of media “are balancing the heart and the science.” The key is getting the right mix, said John Swift, CEO, Investment and Integrated Services at Omnicom Media Group North America: “Fragmentation is such an opportunity. We say to our clients, our job is to put a fragmented world back together.”
 
Whichever angle they came from, everyone agreed the advertising world needs to evolve. “We can’t continue to keep reaching the same person over and over again who might not even want our product,” said Heather Gundry, Director of Integrated Local Buying, Carat, during the Joint Ventures: How to Live – and Thrive! – in a Fragmented World discussion. Michael McAlear, Partner, Account Services, Universal McCann, pointed out more could be done with the data being collected. “If you have the data and technology, why wouldn’t you use it to make your buy better?” he asked. “I believe with our partners, as we come along in the addressability space, there’s more of a vested interest and they can see the results and go back and look at the data.” Looking back at data is something Julie Anson, Associate Director Partner, Magna Global Analytics, is all for, saying, “The beauty of addressable is the granularity of the post report.”
 
Digital out-of-home advertising is growing at a faster rate than digital advertising, said Ari Buchner, CEO of Intersection, during his talk, How Digital Out-of-Home Becomes Truly Programmatic. Yet while digital OOH is four times better than any other medium at driving traffic online, and is more trusted than any other form of digital advertising, programmatic remains elusive, said Buchner, adding, “The industry needs to think of this buzzword omnichannel, and come up with a solution that treats OOH screens in a way that makes them actionable” to unlock value for the entire ecosystem.
 
A CYNOPSIS MESSAGE
The Latest Strategies for Maximizing & Monetizing Mobile Engagement
Tuesday, October 20th | 1:30-3:00PM ET
 
It’s crucial to keep pace in a whiplash-inducing landscape in which fast load speed and easy interface are just the beginning. On October 30th, our speakers from Oath, Group Nine Media and Vox Media will explore the solutions now available to content creators, buyers, and sellers to make the most of mobile.
View Panel                                         Learn More                                         Register your team
 

ELSEWHERE….
 
Food for thought: “I don’t think we had enough B2B conversation [at AWNY],” said Susan Proud, CEO Abacus Sports, after attending all week. “There are more and more companies that are marketing internally because the marketing community has an enormous amount of people in it. It’s almost a dime a dozen to hire someone who knows the intimacies of SEO and other platforms. It’s much easier for a company or corporation to hire their own internal marketing team and then to hire an advertising agency for more specific performance things. It’s much more prevalent than they realize.”
 
Many attendees came from long distances away, but it’s hard to imagine someone having traveled father than WaterAid health worker Samia Malik, who came all the way from Bangladesh to hopefully take home ideas she can use with her NGO. “We want to learn from corporations about their style of advertising so we can adapt it in our sector,” she said. “NGO approaches in terms of advertising and creativity can be somewhat old-fashioned and traditional. If I had to implement one thing when I went back to Bangladesh, it would be in using social media more effectively.” Also, she says she will miss whatever donuts were being handed out on the first and second days. “They had banana ganache in them!”
 
One of the best instances of product placement was the way Slido proved invaluable  assistance at every panel: audience members could submit questions using the program via the AW app. Meanwhile, Key Account Manager for Slido Peter Solcani had some of his questions answered figuratively at Seth Godin‘s This is Marketing panel on Tuesday: “I really liked the idea that the internet was not built to make advertisers happy, but to help people seek content and information,” he said.
 
TOP OF THE MORNING

These days, David Gaines is the chief strategy officer for Wavemaker, the second-largest media agency network in the world – and as such, he and regularly works with clients that include L’Oreal, Netflix, Paramount Pictures, Tiffany and Colgate-Palmolive. But Gaines entered the advertising world from a very different angle than many of his peers, which may explain his singular approach to both the industry and Ad Week itself. Gaines spoke with Cynopsis ahead of his Thursday panel, Brand Love, Brand Loyalty and the Pursuit of Purpose.
 
This is your first Ad Week; what have been your expectations?
I’m intrigued to see if people think loyalty has disappeared completely. I don’t think it has – it’s just been redefined slightly. It would be great to hear people explain that loyalty comes from people meeting the right buyers as they swing in and out of a shallow decision process. My own view is: In the days prior to the Internet people were fundamentally risk-averse, so you rarely tried anything new unless someone had tried it before you. Now you have hundreds or thousands of anonymized people who can tell you what it feels like – so you have to be bolder and braver about trying new things.
 
There was a fair amount of discussion last Ad Week about data siloing being out, and AIs being the wave of the future when it came to sorting out data and micro-targeting consumers. What’s the big push you hope to hear more about this year?
That’s still a valid discussion point because no one’s doing it in a constructive way. People are dwelling too much on the data available to them. It needs to be 60% brand and 40% performance at a base level, and very few companies go with an understanding of brand and performance in the way they need to represent themselves. Does anyone feel they’ve gotten to a place where they’re organized and disciplined enough that their information allows them to connect to brand performance, and fuel creativity – or are we still all scrabbling around?
 
What brand captured your loyalty when you were younger?
I was probably still smoking back then, so Marlboro. Staple stuff from the 1980s – including Levi’s. I race motorbikes, so Triumph. Those brands were informed heavily by culture, and I’m not sure this culture has been. I don’t know whether marketing spends enough time leaning into culturally what is really influencing people. Gen Z shoppers have an expectation: what is going to make my life easier? It’s fascinating how they have so many traits of Boomers or Gen X.
 
What’s a talent you have that few people know about?
I left school at 16 and did an apprenticeship as a bricklayer. I ended up getting taken on in this business because the guys in London wanted to employ someone who didn’t come from university, and I was far away from anyone they would normally employ.
 
TV VS. DIGITAL BY THE NUMBERS
* TV advertising was up 7.1% in January 2018
* Digital ad revenue was up 16.8% in the same period, more than double TV’s rise
* Social media ad spending was up 42% (Facebook alone up 55%)
* Digital advertising market revenue is expected to reach $266M in 2018
* The largest market segment is Search Advertising, with a market volume of $96.7M in 2018
* 13.4% of Display Advertising comes from the retail industry in 2018, the largest revenue share
Source: Standard Media Index, The Statistics Portal
 
AWNY FINAL DONUT CALCULUS
Anyone who wandered through AWNY invariably found themselves tempted by Accelo‘s Wall of Donuts. Here are the final stats:
* Approximately 1700 donuts given away over 4 day period (“We could have gotten rid of more, but sometimes we ran out,” said a spokesperson.)
* Most popular flavor: Vanilla Lavender
 
QUOTE OF THE DAY
“The only reason Wendy’s exists is because [founder Dave Thomas] couldn’t stand eating at McDonald’s or Burger King any more. If anyone is here from Burger King or McDonald, please step up your food.” – Kurt Kane, Chief Concept and Marketing Officer, Wendy’s, on Wendy’s Brings the Sass to Social.
 
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Publisher
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Senior Vice President
Media Communications Group
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VP, Sales
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Director of Operations

 

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